Review: Pilot Iroshizuku Take-sumi

This was my first Pilot Iroshizuku ink. I got it back in late 2015. And I then thought I reviewed it not long after I got it. Then I thought I did so the last time I discovered that I hadn’t, but no. So: third is the charm?

It was my third bottle of ink. My two first ones was Lamy Black(I think I used it for a week before I got rid of it) and Noodler’s Bernanke Black. The Bernanke was a ink I chose because of its short dry time. And it is amazing. But the Take-sumi is not far behind, and has a few other things going for it.

I think something like the Bernanke is good as your first ink, if you are worried about dry time, and then go for something with longer dry time later. The Take-sumi’s colour is backer than the other black inks I have tried, but it isn’t the blackest black you can find. But it looks good with thinner and broader nibs.

This was also the ink that got me into thinking about finding the perfect compromises between colour, dry time and writing experience. And this is one out of two black inks I can recommend to anyone without any hesitation.

What I use paper for in 2017.

I think using analog tools like analog cameras, pens and paper are enjoyable by themselves. And I use them as my primary tool in any situation where it isn’t a hassle.

My calendar is on paper(I use the Field Notes 56-week planner), I keep a journal(a Midori Travelers Notebook), my to do system is in a Leuchtturm1917 Bullet Journal(I also have parts of it in a Taskpaper file on my Mac) and everything I write, including this, started out in a Lined Leuchtturm1917 notebook. And I also keep a Field Notes in my back pocket; it contains my shopping list and the hours I work; it is the perfect format for the stuff I need on the go.

My guiding principle is that I need to be able to use the analog counterpart without loosing anything I care about, without it being a hassle. But the reason at the end of the day is that I think paper works better for me.

I write drafts on paper because its forcing me to do multiple drafts, I use a planner instead of an app because I can’t stand calendar apps and I prefer managing tasks on paper because I find it easier to maintain focus.

Leuchtturm1917: Bullet Journal

I got the Leuchtturm1917 Bullet Journal in the mail a while back, and I honestly believe this is the best notebook available to run a to do list system, or Getting Things Done system on paper.

My personal system is similar to, but not closely related to bullet journaling. I use a small sub section of [Patrick Rhone’s Dash Plus system], and I use things like underlining and boxes to put emphasis on sub projects or important tasks.

The reason I think it is the perfect tool is a combination of the page layout and the multiple page markers(!)(the Bullet Journal version has three, versus the two you find in the regular version). A dotted page layout is not something I have used a lot, because I’m mainly a writer, and lines are awesome when you write. But you get a lot of the same from a dotted line, while you at the same time get more or less the same flexibility you would get from a blank layout. And the multiple page markers, in contrast to just one is a game changer for me. Because you can for example use one to mark where the point where blank pages starts, where all the tasks behind this point is done and what you are working on.

I have written about the paper in Leuchtturm1917 notebooks before, and I still love it. It is for me the perfect compromise between absorption and dry time. Moleskine and Rhodia is on the other side of two different sides of the wrong compromise.

I love it, and it will probably be my task list / work notebook until I see something “better” or more shiny. And I recommend everyone that are doing some kind of task management system on pen and paper to at least check it out.

Daily Carry: a long overdue load out post

This post is long over due. I have tried to write it at least ten times over the last few months, but it never came out right.

You have the stuff that are in my main bag, and then you have the stuff I either wear in some fashion or have in my pockets. They are both a integral part of my daily carry. The weird thing is that I carry my Tom Bihn Pilot almost everywhere.

In my pockets or on my person.

I have been a “listen to audio everywhere I go”-person for as long as I can remember. It probably started when I was around ten years old, maybe earlier. It started with Music, before it morphed into the current mix of music, audio books and podcasts. This means that two of the most important things I carry are my headphones and my iPhone.

My current headphones are the black B&O Beoplay H7, they are okay. They look great, and the bluetooth functionality is awesome, but I wish they were a little bit moer comfortable to use for hours upon hours. And the touch crap on the site triggers accidentally too often.

I currently have the iPhone 6s Plus (space grey) with the product red Apple Leather Case. It replaced the silicone case a few months ago, when it started to fall apart. They are both fantastic, the silicone is a little bit more of a pain to get in and out of your pants, but it feels better in my hand and it feels like it gives more protection. You can’t go wrong with either one, and I think they provide the perfect compromise between protection and minimal bulk.

Then we have my Apple Watch. I don’t think it is a great watch, it is a horrible watch. But I think it provides a few other things that makes me forgive its faults. The notifications are very useful, especially if you like me often need to keep an eye on all the notification in case you need to run and put out some kind of fire. And looking at the Apple Watch is far less intrusive than looking at my phone all the time. I also think it is a excellent device to track things like activity, heart rate and sleep. There are better devices for each one, but again Apple have made a device that delivers on “good enough” in a way that most people can use. I have the Series 1 (black or space grey or what the hell its called) with the Product Red Sports band.

Yes I have a thing for red.

My glasses. Black, with a little bit of white on them. I think they are made by converse. They gets dirty all the time and drive me nuts, but I need them and contacts don’t work for me.

The Trove is one of my all time favourite things, and the best wallet in the world. The problem with wallets is that you add more and more crap to them over time and then you clean out some of the crap but the material is leather or something that isn’t elastic. Which means that all of your cards start falling out if you hold it the wrong way. The trove is made out of an elastic material, which solves this problem. And it also has my favourite design, two small pockets on each side and one larger in the middle; easy access to the stuff you use every day and a room for the stuff you use now and then.

My keys. I still use an old school key ring. I have tried to find something better man times by now, but I never find something that give enough on the “better side”.

My bag.

I still use my Tom Bihn Pilot. There are times when I wish I had a little bit more room, but it is the perfect compromise most of the time. Which is exactly what I want.

The main compartment consists of my 13” Space gray MacBook Pro (the 2016 model with the escape key) and two A5 notebooks(currently the Field Notes Steno), used to keep track of tasks and general note taking. One current and one spare.

The middle front compartment. I have a charger for my laptop in the bottom, and my “bag of everything” on top, My “laptop charger system” is actually a little bit interesting. I have four chargers for my laptop. I have one plugged in in the living room, one at my desk at home and one at my desk at work so that I don’t have to climb under and unplug a lot of crap every time I’m going somewhere. The one in my bag is only for when I am somewhere I usually don’t charge it.

And the bag of everything is a cloth bag filled with various “stuff” (I think it was the bag I got with my headphones). I started to put all the various cables, dongles and other stuff floating around in my bag when it started to drive me nuts a few months ago. I currently have two lightning to usb cables, one micro usb cable, one Apple Watch charger, a small usb- hub, two rolls of 35 mm film, a few SD cards, a usb power bank(small one) and spare batteries for both of my digital cameras.

My left side pocket is usually occupied by one of my three cameras, and the inner pocket is filled with a cleaning cloth for my glasses and a bunch of moistened wipes for my glasses. I have three cameras a my Canon 650D, usually paired with my 40mm pancake, my Fujifilm X100t mirrorless camera and my Nikon FM, an Analog SLR usually paired with a 50mm f1.8 E series lens. I carry either my FM or X100 most of the time. I have three cameras because, there are times when I just want to shoot, get the pictures developed and don’t do anything more: analog, my Canon is what I use when I’m going to take a lot of pictures because the battery life and performance is fantastic and my X100 is what I have when I want something small and “SLR-like” because I can’t stand shooting with an iPhone.

And the right side pocket is filled with stationary. I have a Field Notes planner, my Travelers Notebook filled with two lined refills(used for long form writing and journaling) and my Nock.co Hightower. The Hightower is amazing, you can fit three pens and at least four Field Notes in it, probably more. I use it to carry my passport(the only valid ID I currently own) and two Field Notes. I use them to write down shopping lists and other “projects” I need to have access to without pulling out a larger notebook. And three pens: A stainless Retro 51 with black refill that I don’t use enough or at all, but you never know when you need a “regular” pen, my Lamy 2000 (medium nib) filled with Fuyu-gaki, and my Pilot Vanishing Point(medium nib) also filled with Fuyu-gaki.

I use my Vanishing Point the most, especially if I’m just writing a few lines here and there. But I use the Lamy 2000 a lot of long form and when my VP runs out of ink.

Ink Bottle Design.

There is more to how a bottle of ink look than the pure aesthetics of it, even though I probably enjoy a good looking bottle more than most people. But, there are also some practical concerns that are really important when it comes down to how much of the ink you’ll actually be able to use.

One one side you want something that looks good, and a design that lets you use as much of the ink as possible. But you also at the same time want to have something that is as cheap as possible, because you’ll only use it once.

A potential solution would be a ink well that was designed to let us use as much of the ink as possible, but I think that’s kind of unpractical for most fountain pen geeks, since most of us have a few bottles of ink.

There are two different factors that have a important role when you are looking at how much of the ink you will be able to draw from a bottle. The width of the bottle determines how much or little ink is wasted: wider means more and narrower means less. And then you have the shape of the bottom.

The problem is that you need to submerge a certain part of the nib of your pen in order for the pen to be able to draw ink into your pen. This means that a tall and narrow bottle will be better than a wide and low bottle. Some bottles have a “hole”(in lack of a better word) in the middle, to lower the lowest point and therefore make it easier to use more of the ink. It does help, but isn’t completely without problems. You need a thicker bottom(Pilot Iroshizuku) or some ugly plastic thing to balance the bottle(Lamy).

What Lamy and Pilot are doing, together with many other companies is less wasteful, but what I am wondering is: what cost me as a consumer more to produce fancy bottles or the wasted ink?

Japanese vs German nibs

One of the first thing I noticed when I got my second fountain pen (A Lamy Safari) was how different Japanese and German nibs were.

On one side you have the very wet and smooth German nibs, and on the other side you’ll find something is a little bit more scratchy. When I say “scratchy” I don’t mean it in a bad way, just in the way where are a little bit more resistance.

I enjoy both.

I’m not going to turn this into a Philosophy discussion. But I’m of the belief that form and substance follows each other. This means that how you write is determined by the kind of the writing instruments and paper that are available to you, and how they develop over time is a result of how you write.

The difference between Western and Eastern writing instruments is huge and obvious. Where western writing instruments like the Lamy 2000 focuses on being smooth and moving across the page with as little friction as possible, does a Pilot Vanishing Point focus on giving you as much control as possible.

My western understanding of languages of the east, like Chinese and Japanese is at best limited. But as I understand it their symbols are more or less the same as a word.

In a western language like Norwegian, French or English, either you write with cursive or not, you move fast, and your letters don’t contain much detail if any at all. This means that you move fast, and moving fast without any friction over the page is more important than a lot of fine grained control.

While in a eastern language on the other hand all the details matter much more, and you don’t need to move that fast over the page, because the lettering is much more detail oriented.

The result is that Western pens like the ones of Lamy is much wetter and broader, while Eastern pens like ones of Pilot is much dryer and finer. Both is a result of the interplay between the writing instruments and the kind of writing they have been used for in the different cultures.

Which is better is a difference of taste. I personally love wet and broad nibs, while others prefer something finer.

Pilot Vanishing Point

I’m not sure what to say about the Pilot Vanishing Point. There is a lot to like about it, but there is just as much to not like about it. The most striking thing about it is the unique look, and it is not a good one; at least not for me. You can either get a regular blackish one or one of the other. My biggest problem with all of the other designs is that they kind of have a Mont Blanc vibe going on or as I usually say “a little bit too grand daddy for my taste”.

The regular black is very utilitarian and that is fine. Not every pen you own need to have be considered a piece of art (the Lamy 2000) to be great.

My two “gripes” with this pen is the clip and ink capacity.

The clip on this pen is placed in the grip section, which means that it is either bothering you or not. My impression is that it is either a little bit or very annoying to fellow lefties. I can see why some people hate it, but I’m not that bothered by it itself. But I do not for the life of me understand why Pilot can’t use the lower profile clip they had in the past or why they can’t make a left handed version that is reversed. For christ sake, you can get a replacement nib section, and you can’t get a left handed version of the outer casing? There should be a large enough section in the market for lefties for this.

Pilot Converters and me is an old problem, and I’m pretty sure it will go on until they make them bigger or I die. I’m betting on the latter. It drives me nuts that they can’t make something large enough to get me through a day of a lot of writing. It usually lasts me 2-3 days if I’m only writing tasks and so on. But that can be cut down to somewhere between a few hours and half a day if I write a lot. For example if I take a lot of notes in a meeting or if I am in charge of taking the minutes.

This is why I always carry more than one pen.

Where this pen shines is in the coating and the utility of it. I love how fast I can go from “not writing” to “writing”. And the coating on the pen makes it very comfortable to write for longer periods without feeling slippery. It is the thing I go for the first if I am not going to sit down to write for longer periods.

It’s the perfect “office pen".

My first fountain pen is retired

I bought my first fountain pen around three years ago. It was a Pilot Metropolitan, with what we today call the medium nib. There was no choice back then. Today is the last day I’m going to use it or bring as a part of my “everyday carry”.

I have used it a lot, the clip broke off, the nib is kind of bent out of place and the barrel is all scratched up. But I do love it for what it has become.

This does not mean that I’m ditching the Metropolitan, I got a new one to replace this one around six months ago, and will without doubt continue to be a part of my EDC in years to come. And I do love if for being the best al around “cheap” fountain pen out there, either for experienced or beginners.

Sorry…

Sorry everyone. I have not had much time to poste lately. The weird thing is that I have had drafts laying around it various notebooks, but I have simply not had the time to transcribe them. I have some posts lined up now. And my hope is that I’ll get the time to publish at least bi weekly moving forward.

– Eivind

Bag Philosophy.

My old bag philosophy or lack of one was always to always carry everything I might need. And I did so for way too long. It started when I went too school, I just did everything I could to bring everything I might need in order to not having to think about packing the damn thing, and always having what I needed to do whatever I had to do.

I still think that the general idea is correct.

I currently use two bags. One of them are the bag I use every single day when I go to work, and the other is when I just need to bring more than I can fit in my pockets bag. They are both picket because they have room more just what I need with a little bit margin.

What if I suddenly need to bring X? Yeah, that does not happen that often for me. And the more space you have, the more crap you accumulate to fill that space.

Here is the thing, everything I have in my primary bag is stuff I either use every day or most days. This is good for my back because the bag is lighter and it is much easier to find what I have in the bag because I can get something that fits my needs much closer.

My other bag is something I bought for when I want to carry a small camera, a notebook, a few pens and my phone. Another thing I made sure was that it is easy for bouncers to search and small enough to not fit bottles of booze or wine without being very obvious. Something that is very useful when I end up bringing it when I get drinks.

I also have a camera bag. It is useless for 90% of what I need a bag for. But it is very useful for when I want to bring my big camera, a flash and potentially my other two cameras.

Tom Bihn Pilot: a review.

Like everything else in my life, to get a new bag is always a long running process up until the point where I make up my mind; then it goes really fast. My old Osprey Flap Jack Pack have been in slow decline for at least six months. The plastic parts started to break off, and the fabric look really worn down; especially on the back. I don’t expect more than five years of daily use out of a good backpack.

But what I need from a my daily carry bag have changed a lot since then. I carry less and less stuff.

What I wanted this time was something small, and compact that had room for just what I need, without too much else. I also wanted a configuration of different compartments where they weren’t too big or too small. Too small means that they aren’t that useful, because you can’t fit anything into them and too big have the opposite problem where you can’t find anything.

I carry my laptop, a few pens, a few notebooks, some cables, my laptop and charger and my camera. But not much else. I also carry my headphones, but they don’t need to fit in the bag because I usually use them all the time.

The way I went around it this time was to to look at all the various bags I had collected links to during the last 12 months or so, and to round it down to at 2-3 different makers. Before I looked at what they had to offer. I’m not going into who I didn’t chose. But the reason I went for Tom Bihn was partly their reputation which is hard to challenge or rival and partly because their Pilot look like an exact match for what I need.

I have used it a few weeks now. And I got to say: it is fantastic. The build quality is beyond anything I have experienced. And I can find anything without any hassle(except for my bag of cables, but that isn’t the bags fault).

Everything from the process of ordering the bag to the packing to the fast delivery and the content of the box and the bag itself was delightful.

Ordering anything from Tom Bihn is what I want it to be, not unlike Apple. You pick a product and then you are presented with only the options that are available to that product. In other words, you can’t order a strap that won’t fit your bag.

The delivery all the way from Seattle to Bergen, Norway was very fast. They shipped it the same day I put the order in. And I received it 8 days later. I ordered another package from an European company the same day and a new laptop. Tom Bihn beat all the others by 2-3 days.

The packaging was the way I wish all packing was. They proudly told me that it was carbon neutral, something they didn’t have to, but though was the right thing; both being carbon neutral and informing me about it. What I was presented with when I opened the package was the fact that this box didn’t have a spear inch. They obviously make cusstom boxes for all their products. And a delightful piece of paper on top of the bag. Telling me everything I need to know, including how to return a faulty or “not for me” product.

My next bag will without doubt be from Tom Bihn.

The reason I went for the Pilot is the configuration of the compartments, and how compact it is. I ordered it with a Tom Bhin Laptop cover; they are amazing; I have never seen anything that makes it as easy to take my laptop in and out while at the same time give me the confidence that it is secure.

You basically have four compartments, and a small one on the back, which is perfect for putting mail, paper you receive in meetings and so on. The main compartment have a large compartment and two smaller pockets on one side. I currently have my 13” MacBook Pro and two Field Notes Steno notebooks(one in each of the smaller pockets). My plan is to also carry a iPad once I order a new one.

Then you have the three compartments on the front. Two larger, one of each side and a smaller one in the middle. I use the middle one to carry a laptop charger and a pouch with all the various chargers, dongles and cables. Then I have my camera and pens in the right side pocket and my Travelers Notebook and battery bank in the right side pocket.

I’m so happy with this bag because it feels like I have more room in it than my previous bag, while at the same time being smaller and it also makes it so much easier to find anything.

Year one: a little bit too late.

I think I have three or four drafts of this post in my notebook. My intent was to publish it on the day, but I have simply not had the time to get it done.

This site, and most other writing have to take the back seat while I try to complete my degree as fast as possible and try to get the startup I’m working at off the ground.

I feel really bad about not getting this post out in a reasonable fashion or time and I will try to get it done next year. I’m grateful and surprised over the response this site have received. Everything happened much faster than I had anticipated or hoped for.

What I first and foremost want to do is to say Thank You to everyone who has linked to me since I started. I have no idea how many readers I would have had without it, but it wouldn’t have been many.

There are also two people I have to mention in person because they gave me the initial push, and because I have been a fan of theirs for such a long time: Brad Dowdy and Ana Reinert.

The big question is: what am I going to do with the InkSmudge in year two? I’m going to revisit som of the topics I have written about during the first year, and I am also going to look more at ways to integrate stationary and a like into your life and how to be happy with five pens instead of 50.

And I have a new bag review coming up in a few days.

What is convenient isn’t always better.

I bought an Apple Watch last week. This isn’t really about it, but the charging system Apple went for is a very good example for what I am trying to say.

The inductive charging system on the Apple watch is very convenient, you just place the watch on top of it and leave it. You don’t have to plug anything in, you just leave it on top of the charger. But it isn’t that great. My main problem with it is that it’s too easy for something to bump it off, and then you have a watch that is 50% charged in the morning instead of 100%.

You can say the same thing for a classic Bic Crystal. It is a very convenient pen, and it is pretty damn good for what it is, even though I don’t like it. It works every time, and it is cheap. You could buy a large box of them and leave a few in your bag, on your desk, in your jacket etc. But it isn’t better. You could get a much better pen, for example a Lamy 2000, but that is less convenient, even though the experience of writing with it is worse.

Convenience and the best thing is always up against each other, and you need to find the perfect balance. They work after two completely different set of premises. You want to go as close as possible to “best” when it is something that is important to you, and you want to go as close to convenient as possible when you want it to be as easy as possible.

Why I don’t organise my notebooks.

I’m not that into organising “stuff” into folders or compartments. I don’t do it more than I have to digitally or analogue. The reason I never do it is that what I am going to look for when I need it is almost always different from what I would have categorised it as. My approach is instead to organise things based on what it is. All my plain text notes are in the same place, all my pictures are in the same place; all my Field Notes are in on place and all my larger notebooks in another.

I use search to find my stuff on my computer, and I almost always find it. The way I do it with my notebook is that I write when I started using a notebook, and when I completed it on the first page. Then I write a date on the top of each “text” or “list” or whatever. Then I write “(posted)”, “(transcribed)” and so on on the bottom of each text if I have done so.

It isn’t perfect, and it can be cumbersome to find stuff sometimes. But it gives me just enough context to find what I am looking for.

And I can look through all of my notebooks many more times before I even get close to the time it would have taken to set up and maintain a good system for categorising all of my used notebooks.

End of an era, and when I discovered the benefits of handwriting.

I went to my university’s bookstore yesterday, and bought, what will hopefully be the last batch of books for subjects I am taking. I’ll probably still drop by every now and then to pick up some books.

My plan is to be done with my degree in a few months.

It was when I started at the university that I started to see the real benefits of taking notes by hand. I noticed that I didn’t really remember that much of the seminars and lectures when I took notes on my Macbook, while I remembered a lot more when I used pen and paper.

There have been done a lot of research on the subject, and I’m not going to get into that. But my observation after reviewing some of the notes I have taking both in digital form and analogue form, and my observation is that my digital note is more or less a direct transcription of both the slides and what was said. While my analogue counterparts include was less information.

My impression of my own process is that how I pay attention is the key part here. When I take notes digitally I just passively listen and just write down every single piece of information. While I really have to focus and pay attention to pick up the important information and formulations when I write by hand, because I can’t write down every single thing.

My reason for using pen and paper before I started at the university was because I preferred it, now I use it because it often is the better tool for the job, in most situations, but not all. I still think that a laptop is better if you want a very accurate transcript of the meeting.

We need handwriting.

Articles like this always drive me nuts. We still use hand writing a lot in our daily lives, even though it doesn’t have the same role as it used to have.

The author uses one of the most ignorant and idiotic arguments I have seen in a very long time:

But as a left-hander with terrible handwriting who watched my son struggle to master cursive — he had to stay inside during recess for much of third grade because he wrote his j’s backward — that is a loss I can weather. And history is replete with similar losses; consider how rarely people now carve words in stone, dip pens into ink or swipe platens of typewriters. There will be no loss to our children’s intelligence. The cultural values we project onto handwriting will alter as we do, as they have for the past 6,000 years.

School isn’t just about learning useful skills. It is also about learning a wide skill set, so that you can figure out what you want to do later in life. But the most important thing is that many things in life are hard. You still have to do them, and it is good for you.

You still need handwriting. Many subjects you are going to take require you to do a handwritten exam, not because we are old fashioned, but because subjects like Math, Physics or Logic require very sophisticated software and a lot of training before you are able to do the same thing that you can do with a simple piece of paper and a ruler.

There are also many things in your daily life where you are expected to write by hand, for example when you have to fill out some forms. Or in a meeting when you are brainstorming on large piece of paper or a whiteboard. Or in a meeting with a designer when you are trying to figure out how something should look.

You can probably do the same thing on a computer, and we do, but it is often faster, easier and better to do it on paper.

Now. Cursive. My cursive hand writing is horrible, and I hated it when I had to learn it. But it is still a very useful skill. I can read cursive because of it, even though I can’t write it myself. We have spent many hundred years, and billions of dollars to learn how to understand dead languages that we lost the direct ties to. We will cut the ties to most of the primary sources available to historians if we stop teaching cursive. That is bad. The long term problem is that we could loose the ability to read them at all. The short term problem is for everyone that need in their field or study or other work related task. Instead of using a little bit of time learning it, while learning is easier, they have to learn it much later. This means more training or education for various research positions and probably regular jobs as well before they can do their job.

How to ask the right questions

I think we have established that buying every cool thing that shows up isn’t really my thing. But I do buy stuff when I need them. And this is about how I go forward to figure out what I need.

The first step is that you need to start out with a different starting point than the product. For me it is about replacing something that isn’t what I need, removing something I don’t need or adding something new to solve a problem I don’t have a good solution for.

I always take note when I get annoyed. For example my latest change in my “workflow” for a lack of a better word, is the re-introduction of pocked sized Field Notes. As I said in the blog post, I got rid of them because the format wasn’t the right thing for most of what I were using them for. The format was way too small and limited for managing all of my notes and tasks. But I slowly realised that they were the right thing for a small sub set of my tasks and notes. I don’t always bring my Travelers Notebook when I go shopping, but I always have the room for a Field Notes notebook. There: that is a good place to start.

The reason I focus on having a use for something before buying it, is that most of us have a limited amount of money we can spend on stationary per month and year, and the less I spent on stuff I won’t use, the more I can spend on stuff I will use. It’s not that hard to spend enough on notebooks you don’t use to pay for a Lamy 2000 or something really expensive.

Small or large?

I always try to use the smallest bag I can get away with. This is the kind of where you have room for what you need, and not much more.

My previous bag was perfect for what I needed then. But it is too small because I have to bring my computer to and from work at my current job, something I didn’t need to at my previous.

The one I am using is way too big, and I haven’t found the new “perfect” yet.

My problem with a large bag is that it leaves room for carrying a lot of junk. The result is two new problems, first it becomes full, and then you can’t find anything, because it is full of junk.

The result is that I have to empty it once a week, put back what I need and figure out what to do with the crap.

The thing I like about using a bag where you don’t have much more room than what you need is that you can’t fill it up with crap, and you need to consider every singe thing you want to add. It comes down to how important that new thing is, and figure out what to do. You could chose to not add it, or you could remove something else or get a bigger bag. It all comes down to how important it is.

It always feels like I am doing better choices when I really have to consider everything up against each other. This is one of the ways I try to force myself to do just that.